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Posts Tagged ‘mortgage complaints’

We are Experiencing High Call Volumes

July 5, 2012 1 comment

Due to the segment that was aired on Nightline July 4. 2012 we are experiencing high call volumes and an overwhelming number of emails from homeowners asking for our assistance.

If you are trying to contact us please be sure to let us know if you have a sale date on your home by including that in your phone message or typing it into the subject line of your email.

Please be patient. We will do our best to get in touch with everyone who has contact us.

Foreclosure Photo Exhibit Sheds Light On Housing Crisis

May 17, 2012 Leave a comment

Eleven months after Brandie Barbiere stopped paying the mortgage on her Milliken, Colo., home, her husband found out when he returned from work to see their possessions piled on the front lawn. As a sheriff’s deputy supervised the Oct. 5, 2011, eviction, he confronted his wife and wrestled with his anger. A few minutes later he spotted photographer John Moore. “Who the hell are you?” the husband exclaimed.

“I said I was very sorry this was happening and that I was taking some pictures to show what people all around the country were going through,” Moore recalled. “And he let me stay.”

Moore is one of a small cadre of photographers who have set out to record the life-altering event of a foreclosure, which sometimes is climaxed by an eviction lasting at most two hours. Moore’s pictures and those of 10 other photographers (see slideshow below) form a new exhibit, “Foreclosed: Documents from the American Housing Crisis,” at the Alice Austen House on New York City’s Staten Island, which held its opening reception earlier this month.

Since 2009, Moore has photographed hundreds of evictions in Colorado. “Everybody had a different story,” he said. “Some people had lost their jobs and could no longer make their mortgage payments.”

Barbiere’s foreclosure was triggered by the shrinking of her child care business. Other homeowners had assumed balloon mortgages whose rates readjusted to levels they could not afford. And then there’s Tracy Munch, whom Moore photographed on Feb. 2, 2009, in Colorado’s Adams County. Although she paid her rent faithfully, Moore said, her family was evicted because her landlord had stopped paying the mortgage.

Moore immersed himself in the world of foreclosures after a three-year posting for Getty Images in Islamabad. He returned to a United States besieged by recession and wanted to chronicle one of the causes: the bursting of the real estate bubble. “The struggle was trying to get access to the actual moment when people were being evicted from their homes,” he said.

Read the Entire Article: Foreclosure Photo Exhibit Sheds Light On Housing Crisis.

Economy Watch – Inside the foreclosure factory, they’re working overtime

April 19, 2012 2 comments

 

In a quiet office in downtown Charlotte, N.C., dozens of Wells Fargo’s foreclosure foot soldiers sit in cubicles cranking out documents the bank relies on to seize its share of the thousands of homes lost to foreclosure every week.

They stare at computer screens and prepare sworn affidavits that are used by lenders in courts across the country to seize homes. Paid $30,700 to start, these legal process specialists, the title that goes with the job, swear an oath under penalty of perjury that they’re corporate vice presidents. They’re peppered with e-mails from managers to meet daily quotas of at least 10 or 11 files day.

If they fall short, they face a verbal warning. Then written. Two written warnings could cost them the paycheck that supports a family. As more than one source for this story told msnbc.com, “I can’t afford to lose this job.”

Pressured to meet daily production quotas, they are likely making mistakes that inadvertently could toss a family out of its home and onto the street, according to these workers.

State and federal prosecutors, in a recent settlement with five banks that included Wells Fargo, agreed. The joint state and federal settlement spelled out how the document procedures at the five banks resulted in “loss of homes due to improper, unlawful or undocumented foreclosures,” according to the complaint.

“These are mistakes that could cost someone their home,” a Wells Fargo document preparer told msnbc.com.

Read the Entire Article: Economy Watch – Inside the foreclosure factory, they’re working overtime.

Demand Banks Stop Unfair and Deceptive Practices Against Homeowners

March 30, 2012 1 comment

We’re tired of watching banks destroy homeowners lives.  It’s bad enough to be a homeowner who may have lost a job or is struggling with a health issue.  We’ve all seen how banks take advantage of homeowners when they are the most vulnerable. We’ve created a petition and we’re aiming it at the top!

Collectively we can band together, stop the madness and force banks to do what’s right for homeowners. Help spread the word by sharing this petition with friends and family.

Martin Luther King Jr. once said:  Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter.  It’s time for homeowners to stop being silent and stand up for their rights.

Add your name and Tell President Obama to STOP UNFAIR AND DECEPTIVE PRACTICES BY MORTGAGE SERVICERS!

Message to Wells Fargo – Lopez Family

March 14, 2012 Leave a comment

The Lopez family qualifies for a Homes Affordable Modification but Wells Fargo has denied them repeatedly. Tell Wells Fargo to end discriminatory practices and treat the Hispanic community fairly and equally.

Join Rachel Kendall: Save Our Homes Rally – Lincoln, CA

March 14, 2012 Leave a comment

SAVE OUR HOMES RALLY

Wells Fargo Bank, 945 S State Highway 65 (Map)
Lincoln, CA 95648
Thursday, March 15th, 10:00 AM

Let’s keep the momentum going! Please sign up for this gathering right away! 

We are still working to have Rachel’s wrongful foreclosure rescinded. Several weeks ago Wells Fargo stopped eviction activity and informed us Rachel must complete a trial modification before rescinding the foreclosure. However, to date, Rachel has not received the trial modification documents. Add your name to Rachel’s Change.org petition here.

 

Mortgage Investigation Consistently Hindered By Major U.S. Banks: HUD IG

March 13, 2012 Leave a comment

From The Huffington Post:

The five banks that agreed to a $25 billion settlement to resolve fraudulent foreclosure claims consistently hindered a government watchdog’s investigation into those practices, according to a report released on Tuesday by the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s inspector generals office.

The findings, based on a review of foreclosure practices at Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and Ally Financial over a two-year span from October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2010, essentially confirm what has been reported extensively for nearly two years. Bank employees, in order to speed foreclosures, signed hundreds of legal documents a day without reviewing the accuracy of the foreclosure information, notarized signatures on documents that purported to verify a bank’s legal right to foreclose without ever checking whether that was true, and hired law firms that forged signatures en masse — all with the encouragement of management.

The report was issued by the HUD’s Office of Inspector General a day after the government finally filed in federal court documents that set the terms of the banks’ settlement to resolve a 16-month foreclosure investigation. The Department of Justice used the HUD review in negotiating the settlement.

Though the report describes a pattern of misconduct that appears widespread, it fails to quantify the damage to homeowners or, ultimately, how many home loans were affected. It also clearly reflects the frustration that investigators felt in conducting the review. Even as negotiators for the banks were fighting to win the best possible deal, their lawyers were stonewalling other government investigators trying to ascertain the scope of the “robo-signing” abuses.

Wells Fargo provided a list of 14 affidavit signers and notaries — but then stalled while the bank’s own attorneys interviewed them first. The bank then tried to restrict access to just five of those employees. The reason? “Wells Fargo told us we could not interview the others because they had reported questionable affidavit signing or notarizing practices when it interviewed them,” the report says.

In other words, Wells Fargo did not want the government to talk to employees who might discuss wrongdoing. Eventually, the bank allowed investigators to talk to the remaining employees — but only on the condition that bank management and attorneys attend the interviews as “facilitators.” This condition resulted in delays that may have limited the effectiveness of the interviews, the report says.

Bank of America only permitted its employees to be interviewed after the Department of Justice intervened and compelled the testimony through a civil investigation demand. Even so, the review was hindered, the report says.

“On a number of occasions, Bank of America’s attorneys refused to allow employees to answer questions, stopped them in the middle of clarifying information already provided, or counseled them in private before allowing them to provide a response. Further, [the bank] would not permit an effective walk through of its document execution process that would have facilitated an understanding of its process.”

The investigation into Citigroup’s mortgage division was “significantly hindered” by the bank’s lack of records. Citigroup simply did not have a mechanism for tracking how many foreclosure documents were signed.

Both JPMorgan Chase and Ally Financial refused to provide access to some employees or documents or otherwise impeded the investigation, according to the report.

Bank employees interviewed by the inspector general’s office described a range of pervasive abuses that happened with the consent, and in some cases, active encouragement of management.

Wells Fargo employees testified that they signed up to 600 documents a day without attempting to verify whether any of the information was correct. Employees that notarized documents, including sworn statements that purported to verify a bank’s legal right to foreclose on a home, told investigators that they notarized more than 1,000 documents a day — often without having witnessed the signature of the documents. The bank also relied on low-paid, unskilled workers to do the reviews: a former pizza restaurant worker, department store cashier, and a daycare worker, to name a few.

A vice president at Bank of America testified that she only checked foreclosure documents for formatting and spelling errors. Employees in India supposedly verified judgment figures in foreclosure documents, but none of the U.S. employees interviewed by the inspector general could explain how that process was supposed to work. One former employee described signing 12 to 18 inch stacks of documents without review.

Employees at Wells Fargo and Bank of America testified that they complained about the pace and lack of care given to reviews, but instead of relief, were told to sign even faster. One Bank of America notary said his target was set at 75 to 80 documents an hour, and he was evaluated on whether he met that target. One notary even notarized her own signature on a few documents.

Abuses at the other banks — JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup and Ally Financial — appear just as pervasive. Citi, for example, routinely hired law firms that “robo-signed” documents. An exhibit included with the report shows eight different versions of one attorney’s signature — all apparently signed by different people.

“The matters raised in the report cover observations that are two-four years old and they have been addressed,” said a statement emailed by Wells Fargo spokeswoman Vickee Adams. “Wells Fargo has made significant strides with implementing a number of changes in line with industry and regulatory servicing standards.”

Citigroup has implemented procedures to ensure “that no foreclosure goes forward based on an inaccurate or defective affidavit,” according to a statement emailed by spokesman Mark Rodgers.

“The memorandum references activities from over a year ago that have been addressed as we do all we can to modify loans when possible and to ensure foreclosures are fair when they are unavoidable,” said Bank of America spokesman Richard Simon in an email.

Ally Financial spokeswoman Gina Proia responded in a statement, “As we have stated previously, we regret that possible procedural deficiencies with respect to certain affidavits occurred; however throughout reviews of this matter, there was no evidence of someone being foreclosed on without being in significant default of their loan.”

JPMorgan Chase did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Mortgage Investigation Consistently Hindered By Major U.S. Banks: HUD IG.